KnotMaker 2.2 Written by Derek Smith and Dave Root
   
Help - Individual Ropes window  



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Individual Ropes




The Individual Ropes window allows you to work with individual ropes, such as deleting entire ropes or changing the color of entire ropes or animating entire ropes.

Each rope needs to have exactly one Tail End tile, because this is a unique tile which enables the program to know where each rope begins.

This window contains the following options:


The Rope-building Logic
When you click the "Tools/Individual Ropes" menu item or the "Tools/View in KnotTyer3D" menu item, KnotMaker will start at each Tail End tile and follow the rope through its twists and turns in order to build a separate object for each rope. Based on the direction that the rope is traveling when it leaves a grid cell, the program knows which grid cell is next in sequence for that rope.

For example, imagine that a blue Tail End tile is in layer 2 of a grid cell, and the rope is traveling downward away from the Tail End tile (as shown for rope #1 in the first picture below). In this example, the current grid cell which the program begins examining is the one directly below the Tail End tile (because the Tail End tile is facing downward). As the program travels from the current tile to the next tile in the rope, it follows this logic:

  1. If the current grid cell contains a blue tile in layer 2 which connects to the Tail End tile in layer 2, then that's the next tile in the rope (because the Tail End tile is blue). Based on this tile, the program is able to determine which grid cell will become the current grid cell to examine next.
  2. If step 1 fails to find a tile then the program looks in the current grid cell, starting at the topmost layer, to find a blue tile in any layer which connects to the Tail End tile (because the Tail End tile is blue). If it finds one, then that's the next tile in the rope. Based on this tile, the program is able to determine which grid cell will become the current grid cell to examine next.
  3. If step 2 fails to find a tile then the program looks in the current grid cell, starting at the topmost layer, to find a tile of any color in any layer which connects to the Tail End tile. If it finds one, then that's the next tile in the rope. Based on this tile, the program is able to determine which grid cell will become the current grid cell to examine next.
  4. If steps 1, 2, or 3 succeed, then the program loops back to step 1 using the new current grid cell. If steps 1, 2, and 3 all fail to find a tile then the program assumes that it has reached the end of the current rope.


Fixing Problems in the Rope-building Logic
When the program is building a rope object, there can be rare cases where more than one tile will connect to the previous tile. These cases can result in the rope objects being built inaccurately.

For example, take a look at the following picture. Our eyes tell us that rope #1 travels downward in a straight line, and rope #2 crosses over rope #1 as it travels toward the right. In the Layers window we can see that the highlighted grid cell in column 2 and row 3 has a vertical blue tile in layer 2 (as shown by the letter "A"), so this tile connects to the blue Tail End tile:





The following picture shows the layers for the highlighted grid cell in column 2 and row 4. In the Layers window we can see that there are two tiles (as shown by the letter "B") which can connect to the bottom of the vertical blue tile ("A") in the previous picture:





In the above two pictures, "A" shows a blue tile in layer 2, and "B" shows a blue tile in layer 2 which can connect up with the "A" tile. Therefore, the program will assume that these two tiles connect with each other because they have the same color and they're in the same layer. This means that the two separate rope objects will be built incorrectly in the Individual Ropes screen, as the following two pictures show:

   



In the rare cases where the individual ropes are built incorrectly, you can fix the rope-building logic using one of these methods:

  1. Try changing the color of one of the ropes.
  2. Try changing the layers for the tiles which are causing the problem, so that the two tiles which should connect together are in the same layer.
  3. If you don't want to change the layers that the tiles are in, try adding a duplicate tile so that the appropriate tile will be found in the appropriate layer.
  4. Try changing the drawing so that only one tile will connect up with the previous tile.


Modification History